Video Description: A beautiful solar prominence eruption on the east side of the Sun, recorded over several hours in April 2012 and played back at different speeds. For some perspective on the size of this eruption, the diameter of the Sun is 100 times greater than that of the Earth. That means the eruption was about 10 Earths long. The event was seen by NASA’s SDO satellite. A solar prominence is a large, bright feature extending outward from the Sun’s surface. Prominences are anchored to the Sun’s surface and extend outwards into the Sun’s hot outer atmosphere. A prominence forms over timescales of about a day, and stable prominences may persist in the corona for several months, looping hundreds of thousands of miles into space. Scientists are still researching how and why prominences are formed. The red-glowing looped material is plasma, a hot gas comprised of electrically charged hydrogen and helium. The prominence plasma flows along a tangled and twisted structure of magnetic fields generated by the sun’s internal dynamo. An erupting prominence occurs when such a structure becomes unstable and bursts outward, releasing the plasma. Video courtesy of NASA

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Video Description: A beautiful solar prominence eruption on the…